Is the Plumbing in Your New Home Safe for Raising a Family?

You’ve both worked hard on your careers and are financially secure enough to buy your dream home in the suburbs. It may be an older house, but it’s a single-family detached home in a great area for raising a family.

However, before you consider how you will renovate your new home with cosmetic repairs, you should consider updating the basic infrastructure, especially before you begin to start a family.

How’s the Water Supply in Your New Home?

Low water pressure is not only annoying, but it can be indicative of a leak that may not be readily visible or accessible. If the low pressure is coupled with drinking water that has an odd taste or leaves a rust-colored stain, it is likely to be caused by corrosion in older galvanized steel supply pipes.

Galvanized supply pipes rust away from the inside out over time, and corrosion builds along the inner surface of the pipes. This leaves a very small opening for the water to pass through, and because the water in the supply lines is pressurized, it forces its way through the buildup. Unfortunately, it also brings along some of the corrosion, contaminating your drinking water and pelting your skin and hair in the shower. It also leaves unpleasant stains in sinks, tubs and toilet bowls.

Updating Your Supply Lines

The solution for many years of normal water pressure with no contaminants is to replace your supply lines with CPVC (Chlorinated Poly Vinyl Chloride) pipe, a type of plastic pipe that is designed for supply lines.

This type of pipe will never rust or corrode, and it is less expensive than either galvanized or copper pipe. It can also be used for both hot and cold water lines. Of course, you’ll need to have all of the galvanized pipe removed, including the sections that are embedded in walls and ceilings.

That is why you should consider having the work performed before beginning any type of cosmetic or other kinds of renovations or restorations.

What About Your Drains Lines?

If your drains run slower than normal, they can be replaced at the same time with PVC (Poly Vinyl Chloride) pipe, a similar product that is only applicable for drain lines but shares the other positive attributes of CPVC pipe. If you replace the supply lines without updating the drain pipes, the added water pressure will be of little benefit if the drains can’t keep up with the water flow.

Are There Any Issues With Copper Supply Lines?

Your new home may be supplied by copper pipe, which doesn’t rust. However, if your home was built before 1986, the pipes may be connected with lead-based solder. This was the year that the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) was enacted, banning the use of lead solder in water supply lines.

Lead can leach from the solder and into drinking water, causing a multitude of health problems. Children are especially vulnerable to physical, mental and psychological problems from ingesting lead because of their lower weight and stage of development. There is no cure for the effects of lead poisoning.

If your entire supply line is pre-1986 copper, it will all need to be replaced. Copper is much more expensive than CPVC pipe, and it is more labor-intensive to install, so you may want to consider switching over to CPVC, which of course is not as durable as copper, but your plumbing is rarely exposed to any significant trauma. Copper can also corrode over time, leaving your water supply line vulnerable to future leaks.

If you have any of the above problems in your new home, you need to find a contractor who will be there for all of your plumbing and other HVAC needs.

If you’re in the Greater Cincinnati area, you can’t find a more trustworthy and dependable partner than HELP Plumbing, Heating, Cooling, And Electric. They have served their customers for nearly 80 years and realize that commitment and trust are the core values of both family and business. They would like to serve your family as well.